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New Utility Knife is a Big Disappointment

March 20, 2012

I often use a utility knife around the house and yard to cut string, carboard, plastic bottles, etc.  I have had one utility knife from ACE for a long time. I think that I got this particular knife in the late 60’s, but I may have lost that one and replaced it.  Here is what it looks like:

 The knife is a simple design and has served me well for many years.  You remove one screw and open the knife to replace the blade.

 This particular knife takes about a minute to replace the blade (or turn it around if needs   it)


Here is the knife as it looks when you open it up.  The blade slide is on the right top and there is a place to store spare blades in the bottm right.  A nice design for applications that do not damage the blade very often.

Unfortunately, I misplaced this knife and needed a replacement so I bought one that quickly became my favorite Utility Knife.


 This is my preferred utility knife now.  It is the Pro Series from BK Tools.  The black thumbwheel on the right adjusts how easy it is to slide the blade in or out.


 Here is the left side.  The thumb slide to push the blade out is silver and of a decent size and grip for easy use.  On the far right is a button you press to pull out the blade holder.


 Here is the blade holder partially removed.  The thumb slide button is just sitting on top of the blade holder.


Here the BK Tools knife is taken apart showing all the parts and the spare “break-apart” blades.  When one part of the blade becomes too dull, you break off the end and there is a fresh tip to be used.  Each replacement blade has about 8 segments.  No tools are needed to dismantle the knife, to replace the blades, etc.


 Here I have just rolled the thumb button off of the blade holder.  There is a bump on the thumb button that fits into a hole in the blade to push it out.  The blade holder can be completely removed without the blades falling out of it.


On the back of the blade holder is a spring loaded piece of metal that holds the blades from falling out if the slide is removed from the handle of the knife. Here I am lifting the catch so the blades can be removed.


The blade holder slides out easily for refilling with blades.  It slides back in with little effort to keep the slider button in place (it just sits loosely on top until the holder is back inside the handle).


I left my BK Tools Utility Knife at someone’s house and needed one to use right away so I purchased a new knife with some interesting features.  This is the Stanly Bostitch 789.  It holds two blades side by side and you can slide either one of them out for use.  This is great for me where I use a straight blade for cutting cardboard or plastic and use a curved blade to cut twine.  Here the new blade storage is open showing the two spares that come with the knife.  I did not care for the way the storage compartment was latched or how it is opened by pushing a button on top of the knife.


 You can see the two thumb sliders on the top, only one of which can be used at a time.

 Replacing the blades is another story.  First, it uses a TP10 torx bit to remove the two fasteners.


 There are LOTS of parts and pieces to this knife. It was easy to take apart once I found my torx bit.


Getting it back together proved to be not as easy.  It seems that I had to fight with every piece to get it to stay in place for assemlby.  It is quite likely that I will dispose of this knife in the near future.  Now, where did this tiny part come from?  I think this knife is a good idea but the design and functionality is very poor.  I highly doubt if they have repeat sales on this knife.

To wrap it up, I will probably be using two knives in the future.  One knife (my really old one) with a curved blade installed and another knife (the BK Tools) with “no tools required, super easy to replace” straight blades.

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